Sonnet (Petrarchian) - Acceptance

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mdmorash
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Sonnet (Petrarchian) - Acceptance

Post by mdmorash » Fri Aug 06, 2004 9:29 am

Now fanning the flames of a long past love.
While feeling the tender and reaching touch.
Wanting and needing no less, but as much.
Never descending from what is above.

Whispers are coming of things once in love.
Something so simple outside of your clutch.
Longing so simply for needing too much.
Lost in the breeze on the wings of a dove.

Search yourself inward, right there in your core.
Search for the answers to questions unasked.
Knowing those answers, and what they are for.

Open you being and rivers will pore.
Washing away all those things you have masked.
Leaving you peaceful, with much to adore.

Michael David Morash
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Copyright © 2004
Humor is the only test of gravity, and gravity of humor; for a subject which will not bear raillery is suspicious, and a jest which will not bear serious examination is false wit.

Aristotle (384 BC - 322 BC)

How poor are they who have not patience! What wound did ever heal but by degrees.
-- William Shakespeare

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heinzs
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Post by heinzs » Fri Aug 06, 2004 12:25 pm

Is this in the Petrarchan form? I like what you've done with it.

(rhyme scheme abba, abba, cdc, cdc)

Shakespearean sonnet is abab, cdcd, efef, gg and fixed iambic pentameter.

:cool: :cool:
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mdmorash
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Post by mdmorash » Fri Aug 06, 2004 1:40 pm

Yes it is a Petrarchan sonnet. Ilike this form better. I seems to flow smoother than the Shakespearian form.

Thanks for reading.
Humor is the only test of gravity, and gravity of humor; for a subject which will not bear raillery is suspicious, and a jest which will not bear serious examination is false wit.

Aristotle (384 BC - 322 BC)

How poor are they who have not patience! What wound did ever heal but by degrees.
-- William Shakespeare

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