Call My Name

Forum dedicated to form in poetry, classical and new, and a discussion of poetic forms and poets.
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mdmorash
Clearwater Poet
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Call My Name

Post by mdmorash » Sun Aug 08, 2004 2:45 pm

So call my name in times of grief.
No, do not wait till all is lost,
Lost there beneath the winters frost.
For in the night there comes a thief,
To reap your soul just like a sheaf;
Your protests then they will exhaust,
So call my name.

For I will keep your waiting brief;
While catching what from you’s been tossed,
Upon the ground to pay the cost;
I vow to you this true relief,
So call my name.

© 2004
Michael David Morash
All rights reserved
Humor is the only test of gravity, and gravity of humor; for a subject which will not bear raillery is suspicious, and a jest which will not bear serious examination is false wit.

Aristotle (384 BC - 322 BC)

How poor are they who have not patience! What wound did ever heal but by degrees.
-- William Shakespeare

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heinzs
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Post by heinzs » Sun Aug 08, 2004 3:29 pm

Michael, does this form have a name? This is the second one you've posted. They move rapidly and carry a good punch.

:cool: :cool:
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mdmorash
Clearwater Poet
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Joined: Sun Jul 25, 2004 9:56 am
Location: California, wishing I was back in Canada

Post by mdmorash » Mon Aug 09, 2004 1:47 pm

Yes, Heinzs, it is called a Rondine. It consists of two stanzas (a septet and a quintet) with a rhyme scheme of a.b.b.a.a.b.R....a.b.b.a.R. The "R" is a refrain which is made up of the first phrase of the first line. The French form of this type of poem is not bound by a rhyming pattern, but the English form is more formal and is built with either Tetrameter or Pentameter.

There is also a simalar style called a Rondeau. It is made up of 3 stanzas (a quintet, a quatrain, and a sestet) whith a rhyme scheme - a.a.b.b.a....a.a.b.R....a.a.b.b.a.R. For a really good example of this style check out Lt. Col. John McCraes' poem entitled "In Flanders Field".

I like both of these styles. They take some getting used to, but when you do they're really fulfilling.

Anyway, I hope this explains the forms clearly. Sometimes I ramble and make no scence. :oops:

Thanks once again for reading my stuff.

Michael
Humor is the only test of gravity, and gravity of humor; for a subject which will not bear raillery is suspicious, and a jest which will not bear serious examination is false wit.

Aristotle (384 BC - 322 BC)

How poor are they who have not patience! What wound did ever heal but by degrees.
-- William Shakespeare

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heinzs
The Fat Cat
Posts: 8400
Joined: Tue Dec 18, 2001 12:01 am
Tag line: Do no harm
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Post by heinzs » Mon Aug 09, 2004 2:05 pm

Thanks Michael! Excellent explanation. I thought I had recognized the style but couldn't put a name to it. "In Flanders Fields" is one of my all time fav poems and I even quote it in one of mine *grin*.

Cheers!

H.
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An' it harm none, do what ye will. Blessed Be.
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Jade
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Post by Jade » Thu Aug 19, 2004 3:29 pm

This is a very pleasant poem. I loved it to the max. Now I have to go write this form. lol... thanks for sharing it with me.
sticks and stones are hard on bones
aimed with angry art,
words can sting like all things
but it's silence that breaks the heart
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